The SRSC Forest and Fish (formerly ‘TFW’) Program provides technical support and oversight to ensure protection of fish, water and other treaty resources from negative impacts of logging and other timber activities.

The first century of unregulated logging in the Skagit caused widespread damage to watersheds and fish habitat. These impacts were extensive and will take decades to be reversed. However, since the 1970’s, awareness of the landscape’s sensitivity has lead to greatly improved forestry practices and regulations. We are now seeing significant improvement in the condition of fish habitat and water resources and continue to steer toward full recovery.

Managed forest landscape south of the Skagit and the town of Lyman shows a mixture of forest ages from ongoing harvest. Although upland streams are too small and/or steep for salmon use, buffers and other protection measures are needed to maintain productivity downstream.
Managed forest landscape south of the Skagit and the town of Lyman shows a mixture of forest ages from ongoing harvest. Although upland streams are too small and/or steep for salmon use, buffers and other protection measures are needed to maintain productivity downstream.

To help achieve this, Forest and Fish staff is engaged with day-to-day forestry decisions, seeking solutions that are technically sound and support both resource recovery and ongoing forest management.

  • Our work extends across timberlands within the Skagit, Sauk and Samish River basins. All are lands covered by our member tribes’ treaty rights, which include fish habitat protection.
  • Forest &Fish staff works closely with resource agencies (DNR, DOE, DFW), industrial and small forest landowners, other tribes and organizations.
  • Our touchstone is the 1999 Forest and Fish Report, which is the basis for Washington’s Forest Practices Regulations. The Forest and Fish Report was developed jointly by forest landowners, agencies, tribes and others as a pathway to achieve recovery of salmon and water quality, while supporting a viable timber industry.

We provide a variety of technical and data services:

  • Technical assistance with application of forestry regulations – water typing, unstable slopes, forest roads, etc.
  • Collaboration on streamside management strategies, including Alternate Plans
  • Facilitation of cultural resource issues, in coordination with tribal cultural staffs
  • Providing access to archived data on fish distribution, historic forestry permits and other documents
    Watershed assessment and monitoring

We assist anyone with these issues at no charge; our hope is that land use decisions are made using the best available information.

Ecologist Anna Mostovetsky inspects the lateral margin of a large deep-seated landslide. Landslide prevention and mitigation is an important aspect of watershed recovery on forest lands.
Ecologist Anna Mostovetsky inspects the lateral margin of a large deep-seated landslide. Landslide prevention and mitigation is an important aspect of watershed recovery on forest lands.
Biologist Mike Olis surveys salmon and steelhead habitat in lower Jackman Creek near Concrete.  The Forest and Fish program monitors habitat conditions and stream temperatures to evaluate the effectiveness of current forest management practices.
Biologist Mike Olis surveys salmon and steelhead habitat in lower Jackman Creek near Concrete. The Forest and Fish program monitors habitat conditions and stream temperatures to evaluate the effectiveness of current forest management practices.

 

Forest and Fish Staff:
Curt Veldhuisen, Program Director and Hydrologist
Mike Olis, Fish Biologist
Anna Mostovetsky, Ecologist